This was a triumph.

The Smallest GitHub Fork

Not gonna bury the lede: I forked a project in GitHub to change a color in a colorscheme. That's basically a tiny one-word change.

I changed jobs a few months ago, and I have the longest commute yet. I far prefer working in the office, but I don't want to have to be in the office to resolve any little emergency. So I set up my environment to be able to work from home.

First, there's access to work's VPN. Absolutely no problem there. That's the first thing everybody needs to work from home.

Then, just in case I need to see my work computer's desktop, there's VNC. I got close, but no cigar.


I set up a server, and can connect via multiple clients, but they all have the same blitting problem when it comes to launching applications. No big deal, there's another way to skin that cat.

If I can't see my work computer's desktop, I can still run its GUI applications via X11 Forwarding. That's pretty good, but those apps always look a little weird on the client side.

Then there's the last resort: good old ssh with a text-based editor. And in my case, that's vim. Low-bandwidth, and gets most of the jobs done.

There was a problem even with that last resort. In the color scheme I use, sometimes words would become invisible when running vimdiff. It depends on the context coloring of the source files. In the following screenshot, there are words in the fuschia line that we can't see.


It's an easy-enough problem to fix. The normal thing to do is to find the configuration file, desert.vim, and change the offending color to not be fuschia. Then you're done, your problem is solved.

But I'm a developer, and to my mind, this stinks of a bug. And if it affects me, it could affect others, too. So the right thing to do is to fix the bug in a public fork, and possibly share the fix with a pull request.

I found the original repository, and made my fork. I fixed the bug. Text on the changed lines would now be visible. While I was in there, a couple of other changes wanted to be made. I made deletions muted red, and additions green. But without a screenshot, visitors wouldn't know how the change looks. So I made the screenshots.


(Both screenshots here look a bit garish. The screenshots don't reflect what a real vimdiff would look like. In practice the improved scheme works much better for me.)

Since I now had the screenshots, I updated the README file to show the effect of the change in place.

I committed my changes, and thought to myself, "isn't it interesting the lengths developers will go to, to fix little problems and document those fixes? And how a tiny fix can grow into something larger?" I oughtta blog about it.

2 Comments on "The Smallest GitHub Fork"

  1. David on February 8th, 2015

    Brilliance I say! This is what makes you a good developer. You stop and take the time to address something like this rather than learn to just "live with it" I truly believe that a smooth working flow is vital to health and longevity in a work place. If you look at you tool and see the bug every day, or even changed it in the config, but it reminds you how that but caused it every day, you start associating it with the bug. As negative connotations grow this is how so many people dub decent software as "crappy". Henry having a bit more negative every day as you use the software even if on a subconscious level. So I am glad to see the effort and applaud you, and wish more people would do this!

  2. David on February 8th, 2015

    Aw, thanks! I admit that I was hoping that my readers would see why I bothered going through the trouble.

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